Archives: Blackout Portraits by Jason Florio

 

Blackout Portraits 'Policeman' - Mogadishu © Jason Florio
Blackout Portraits – Policeman, Mogadishu © Jason Florio
Blackout Portraits 'Soldier TFG' - Mogadishu © Jason Florio
Blackout Portraits – Soldier, Mogadishu © Jason Florio

 

Blackout History

In the mid-1940’s as the German’s blitzed London, my grandmother and her neighbors used clothes to blackout the light emitting from their windows so as not to guide the Luftwaffe on their deadly mission…’ In the mid-90’s, unbeknown to him at the time, Jason Florio began to use the very same blackout curtain, which his grandmother used during the World War 11, as a backdrop to various portrait collections. Read & see more on Florio’s website

'Fighter for the Karen National Liberation Army' - Blackout portraits, Burma © Jason Florio
‘Fighter for the Karen National Liberation Army’ – Blackout portraits, Burma © Jason Florio

 

'Makasutu' Portraits, The Gambia ©Jason Florio
‘Makasutu’ Blackout Portraits, The Gambia ©Jason Florio
'Silafando' The Gambia - Blackout Portraits © Jason Florio
‘Silafando’ – Blackout Portraits, The Gambia © Jason Florio

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Documenting a past regime – ex-MILE II prisoners, The Gambia, West Africa

Photojournalist, Jason Florio, prepares to interview ex-Mile2 prisoner, Ballo, The Gambia, West Africa
Photojournalist, Jason Florio, prepares to interview ex-Mile II prisoner, Ballo – beaten, tortured, kept in solitary confinement – The Gambia, West Africa © Helen Jones-Florio
‘for 2 years I did not see daylight…’
Portrait of ex-Mile2 prisoner, Ballo - The Gambia, West Africa © Helen Jones-Florio
Portrait of ex-Mile II prisoner, Ballo -beaten, tortured, kept in solitary confinement – The Gambia, West Africa © Helen Jones-Florio

 

Interviewing ex-Mile2 prisoner, Ngoi Njie, The Gambia, West Africa ©Helen Jones-Florio
Interviewing ex-Mile II political prisoner, Ngoi Njie -beaten, tortured, and witnessed the torturing to death of her friend and fellow activist, Solo Sandeng –  The Gambia, West Africa ©Helen Jones-Florio

 

Ngoi Njie - ex-Mile2 political prisoner, who was beaten and tourtured, The Gambia © Jason Florio
Portrait of ex-Mile II political prisoner, Ngoi Njie -beaten, tortured, and witnessed the torturing to death of her friend fellow activist, Solo Sandeng –  The Gambia, West Africa © Jason Florio

 

We’ll be posting more about our interviews with the ex-Mile II prisoners, in the coming weeks.

The Florios

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Instagram - ©floriotravels
Instagram – ©floriotravels  images © Jason Florio & Helen Jones-Florio

Moto-Taxi boys – Labé’s got style, Guinea-Conakry, West Africa

 

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Motorcycle taxi boys, on the streets of Labé, Guinea-Conakry, West Africa © Jason Florio

 

Labé, the capital of Guinea-Conakry, up in the Fouta Djallon, is motorcycle city, overrun with thousands of Chinese-made bikes – and ‘moto taxis’ are the way to travel, carrying a minimum of 2-3 passengers a piece. As we walked around the town, we had to constantly dart out of  the way as  a ‘moto’ zoomed towards us, at maximum speed– within inches of us – “à ton, à ton!” (we have this expression: ‘taking no prisoners’, which seemed rather apt, on the frenetic, horn-blaring, streets of the capital, as we leapt and scurried out the pathway of motorcycles, coming from all directions!).  “In Labé, there are too many accidents every day.” Saif (our local fixer) told us, as he led us through the dusty, stinking, dirty, litter-filled streets of the downtown area. Despite the moto-taxi dodging, and the putrid aromas, Labè is a vibrant, animated, friendly place – ‘Jarama’s’ (local Pula language greeting), “bonjour’s”, and “ca va’s”, abound, from every smiling, curious (intrigued by the two ‘portos’ – white people/European) person we pass’  – words by Helen Jones-Florio – extract from ‘The Long and Winding Road… Kedougou, Senegal – Labé, Guinea-Conakry – and back again‘ Read more on the River Gambia Expedition blog.

 

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Ebu – on his moto-taxi, in Mali-Ville, Guinea-Conakry – and our (extremely bumpy!) ride back down the Fouta Djallon Highlands to Kedougou, Senegal.
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Motorcycle taxi boys, on the streets of Labé, Guinea-Conakry, West Africa © Jason Florio 
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Photographer, Jason Florio, gets details from moto-taxi rider, Labé, Fouta Djallon, Guinea-Conakry – image © Helen Jones-Florio

Economic Migrant Gold Miners, South Eastern Senegal, West Africa

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© Jason Florio Economic Migrant Gold Miners, South Eastern Senegal, West Africa

Thursday 20th December 2012 – Paddling distance: 11.4km (total to-date: 83.65km) – ‘River Gambia Expedition1044km source-sea African odyssey

Even our tents and canoes, situated by the river over 2 miles away from the mine itself, were covered in a fine film of the pale pink, talc-like dust…

‘A relatively short day’s paddling on the River Gambia today, as we wanted to stop and visit another gold mine in South Eastern Senegal. This stretch of the river is dotted with artisanal gold mines – which draw thousands of migrant workers from all over West Africa: Guinea-Bissau, Ghana, Guinea-Conakry, Mali, and Senegal itself. All of them hoping to make their fortune. Whole families live in and around the mines, in makeshift villages (rather disconcertingly described as the ‘Wild West‘ of SE Senegal, during our pre-expedition research). All the mines we visited were understandably dusty, but this one, in particular, had an extremely fine, pink-hued, dust which got into absolutely everything. Even our tents, and canoes, situated by the river – over 2 miles away from the mine itself – were covered in a fine film of the pale pink, talc-like dust. But, at least we could pack up our tents and leave the next day, washing away the dust. Many of those people whose lives revolve around the gold mines, for months and years in some cases, aren’t so lucky, as they inhale toxic fumes from the mercury – used to separate the gold from the rock dust…’ Words by Helen Jones-Florio. Read more on the River Gambia Expedition blog.

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Jason Florio photographs the gold miners © Helen Jones-Florio
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HJF with ‘Tolleh Kaafo’, S.E. Senegal gold mines © Jason Florio